AEROSPACE APPLICATION

EOS Supports TREL students to produce Rocket’s Havoc Engine

Havoc engine
Above: Havoc engine powering the TREL Halcyon rocket/Image Source: TREL

EOS, the world’s leading technology supplier in the field of industrial 3D printing for metals and polymers, recently revealed its ongoing support for the students at the Texas Rocket Engineering Lab (TREL) while enabling them to work on its Havoc engine.

EOS is providing TREL—a collegiate rocket laboratory committed to providing students the resources and guidance needed to succeed in the New Space Industry—with CAD training, professional counsel, material resources and 3D printing of advanced rocketry components that are lighter and allow for more complicated geometry than traditional machined parts. The students will get a chance to work on EOS Havoc engine.

These components will be mission critical to TREL’s Halcyon rocket—a 28-foot-tall liquid bipropellant rocket designed to fly to the edge of space —for the Base11 Space Challenge. The Base11 Challenge is an international competition that tasks student-led teams with launching a liquid-bipropellant, single-stage rocket to the Karman Line, which, at an altitude of 100 kilometers, would shatter the previous collegiate altitude record for a liquid bipropellant rocket by 30x. 

Havoc engine
Above: Additively manufactured TREL rocket test parts/Image Source: TREL

As the students take on this notable challenge, EOS will provide design and production support as TREL students work to produce the rocket’s “Havoc” engine— a regeneratively cooled, LOx–RP-1 fueled, state-of-the-art engine with a unique regenerative cooling geometry that has been configured for advanced additive manufacturing techniques. In addition to the Havoc engine powering the rocket, EOS will help produce aerodynamic fins to control Halcyon rocket during flight.

According to Patrick Boyd, Marketing Director at EOS, “The space industry already relies heavily on 3D printing, and today’s university students are the pipeline to advancing the industry bringing with them both the knowledge necessary to thrive and the AM mindset to successfully engineer and create ideas never before possible. We decided long ago to play our part in supporting TREL and similar university teams across North America, helping ensure their success and providing them direct access to our AM expertise and technology – the most direct way we can augment their studies and projects.”

Lauren Rodriguez, a third-year student at UT and lead propulsion engineer for TREL, said, “Working on the EOS Havoc engine has been a highlight of my college experience. With EOS, I have been able to learn so much about advanced additive manufacturing capabilities and rocket engine fabrication, which are subjects you can’t learn in a classroom. By designing, building, and testing our own 3D prints, we are able to push forward the leading edge of rocket engine development.”

Texas Rocket Engineering Lab
Above: Students from the Texas Rocket Engineering Lab (TREL) at the University of Texas/Image Source: TREL

EOS’ support has enabled TREL to undertake an ambitious design for Halcyon rocket as well as furthered TREL’s greater mission to incubate the next generation of aerospace pioneers.

EOS’ partnership with Texas Rocket Engineering Lab represents its latest investment in its long-term mission to advance AM education. EOS is rapidly building partnerships and programs that deliver inspiration, awareness, and enablement to future AM creators – from elementary school students to university engineering teams to key decision makers on the front lines of the additive manufacturing revolution.


About Manufactur3D Magazine: Manufactur3D is an online magazine on 3D Printing. Visit our Global News page for more updates on 3D Printing Technology News. To stay up-to-date about the latest happenings in the 3D printing world, like us on Facebook or follow us on LinkedIn.